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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 349 (some duplicates have been removed)
-remembered ancient greece and rome. the poet shelley wrote at the beginning of the 19th century, "we are all greeks. "our laws, our literature, our religion, our arts "all have their roots in greece. "but for greece, we might still have been savages and idolaters." the human form and the human mind attained to a perfection in greece which has impressed its image on those faultless productions whose very fragments are the despair of modern art and which can never cease to delight mankind until the extinction of the race. in the 18th and 19th centuries, europeans surrounded themselves with the images of greece and rome. they created for themselves personal museums which displayed their wealth, taste, and learning and idealized the virtues of reason, liberty, and justice. in this way, they elevated-- and even masked-- their mundane relationships with land ownership and manufacture, trade and empire, and they exported these ideals and the visual language which expressed them all over the world-- to the americas, the indies, and beyond. it is appropriate, then, that these are the first pictures we see i
for a chance to apply for asylum in greece. >> we slept in the stores because the police came to look for us every day. >> world leaders deny there is a global currency war. are all the major powers secretly devaluing? inventors often are not rewarded. >> people who are supposed to run our innovation units treat me like dirt. >> when it comes to refugees and migrants, agrees is the front door of europe. at one point, 300 people a day were crossing greece's border with turkey illegally. on mass roundup was 70,000 people picked up off the streets in six months. these are the figures, but behind them, he minute stories. we have one man's account of his journeys through the system. this was the biggest textile factory in greece. today, it lies abandoned and is famous for something else. felt here a year ago, hundreds of migrants were squatting in the factory, desperate to get out of a greece. >> it does not feel like europe. this is no europe. >> my guide was this man. a moroccan living in the factory. place,en, as we left the i never expected to see him again. today, at the factory looks quiet,
is this problem in greece. please be warned, there is some flash photography. >> greece is a place where economic crisis has given way to social crisis. strikes paralyzing the capital, and now, political violence. somebody fired a kalashnikov. now, the left wing has increase the ante, making accusations about the secret service in the 1970's. in 1969, a bomb in the -- in milan left several dead. it is a state with in a state. a strategy of tension. today, there is the gospel of the present great government. the coalition government brought about last year has stabilized the fiscal situation, but it is politically fragile. this is becoming perhaps the first marxist prime minister. >> a secret strategy of creating violent attention. >> it is not exactly a secret strategy. i think it has been obvious that the government has been trying to do this, intensify conflict, which increases fere within the greek society. this is very dangerous for democracy itself. it is our government, and if he believes he can run the country using blackmail, terrorism, he is sadly mistaken. >> anarchists were caught tryi
in a moment, but first, we take a look at the progress greece has made towards reviving its shrugging -- struggling economy. >> some are finding a way to turn the crisis to their advantage. still, the government's deep cuts have hit the economy hard and ordinary greeks are still struggling to get by. >> the winter months have produced a rare bright point for the greek economy. this ski resort is only two hours from athens, and business is good as many greeks shy away from costly vacations abroad. fuel has become more expensive, so many people cannot afford to travel long distances. that is why many holidaymakers are returning to our ski resorts, but ski slopes are not the only success story. last year, exports of all of oil from greece increased to record levels. the export sector is the only one that is expanding during the crisis, forcing greek companies to rethink their markets. >> businesses that rely exclusively on greet customers to buy their products have had to except that the domestic market here has collapsed, and they have to seek new opportunities abroad. >> some greek fir
to the discourses of tutors often imported from greece. so many villas were built along the bay that the ancient historian strabo observed that they looked like "one continuous city." the presence of villas built by the ruling families attracted romans eager to further their careers through access to the political elite. villa owners brought extraordinary wealth to the region and fostered its rise as an artistic center of exceptional sophistication. artists followed, filling demands for paintings and luxurious decorative arts to adorn the interiors of the villas, and sculpture to ornament courtyards and gardens. materials from the roman dominions flowed into campania's harbors -marble from athenian quarries for statues, reliefs and vases... nubian gold and emeralds from egypt for jewelry. livia, wife of augustus, is carved in egyptian basanite, a stone once reserved for sculptures of deities -- a subtle reference to roman imperial triumph. wealthy residents of the towns beneath vesuvius shared the taste for luxury found in the more affluent villas on the bay. silver mirrors... and cups... bronze
countries, portugal, ireland, greece, and spain. it is the third biggest in the eurozone. it is 10 times the economy of greece. italy would be impossible to bail out. the economy is not that bad. it is still a lot lower than spain or greece. italy's problem is a lack of growth on par with haiti and zimbabwe. that is the problem with its growing. it just evaporate any chance at it being able to repay the huge debt which stands at about 120% of gdp. that is why the eurozone is looking at italy quite closely. the answer so far seems to be austerity. that is what mario monti's government has been pushing. like and other country, greece and spain have huge question marks on whether austerity is the best or worst thing for the economy? it means the economy does not grow. that is one of the issues of anyone at the voting booth today or tomorrow. >> thank you. staying in rome, pope benedict the 16th has been reassuring ball worse that he is not abandoning the roman catholic church. he was giving his final sunday blessing to a packed crowd. paul brennan has the story. >> it lasted barely 10 minut
. this is something they didn't want to see. obviously, greece got into a situation by longtime mismanagement on the fiscal side, dragged the banks in. in the case of ireland, it was the banks that dragged sovereign in, much different i. wilbur is an expert on that. in the case of portugal, and we have some portuguese in the audience here, it was basically a decade of no growth in portugal. in the case of spain, it was a bubble in real estate that was financed by mainly the savings and loan institutions, some of which have gone under, a number have gone under, and a government that basically drove up the deficit and regional governments, because regions are very important in spain also drove up this problem with big deficits. and they weren't attended to. and so in each one of these you have somewhat of a different reason. the case of italy a debt to gdp of over 120% and growing, and the lack of action in trying to do anything about it by the former government. monti came in as a technician and, by the way, technicians are great, but their period of time is limited because they have no popula
be at hand. >> you know, the bond market is a funny thing. in greece the bond market was perfectly fine until february of 2010. not moving. not doing anything, and then in two weeks it was over, but if we don't deal with it in the next four or five years, the same thing is going to happen. we're going to wake up. interest rates are going to explode and the next generation, they are going to have a very, very tough time and it's so unfair. >> no surprise that our rick santelli agrees with druckenmiller but dean baker is not worried. he says this isn't and will not be greece. dean, where do you think druckenmiller is going wrong then? >> we've been hearing these things for four years and i'm waiting. three big differences between the united states and greece. first, we're a huge diversified economy, not a little country dependant on tourism. secondly, people in the u.s. pay their taxes, you know. greece had a deficit of about 7% of gdp. that would be over $1 trillion a year in the united states before the collapse. we have a very different story. the third is a huge difference. we have our own
expect the job market to bounce back in the coming weeks and months. >> just when it seemed as if greece's economic woes had disappeared from the news, transport workers and medical staff went out on strike on thursday. the economy has entered a sixth successive year of recession, and locals are angry at the difficulties they have to face. >> protesters say the choice, consisting of the imf, the eu, and the ecb, have impose policies on the country that are crippling and dangerous. protesters are demanding changes. >> dockworkers walked off the job in greece. so did bus drivers. overground trains were not running in athens, either. another strike in greece in protest to deeply unpopular austerity measures. weather it is public transport workers or doctors, people are fed up with falling standards of living and cuts to wages. more than a quarter of the greek work force is now unemployed. >> we oppose planned cutbacks, and we want them canceled. we want collective agreements signed any back pay we are owed. employment conditions must meet the needs of the workers. >> it is unlikely these de
will run the country until then. >> in neighboring greece, workers have walked out in the nationwide protest against wage cuts and high taxes -- in a nationwide protest against wage cuts and high taxes. we are looking at live pictures out of athens. the 24-hour strike is forcing schools to close and leaves hospitals working with emergency staff. greece's two biggest labor unions, represent an half of the country workforce, called for the walkout. it comes just days before international lenders are due in athens to discuss the next installment of a bailout. spain's prime minister is due to give his annual state of the nation address to parliament. rajoy isjoy -- mariano likely to defend the measures they have been taken -- taking, and denial that he has been ta king payments. the. he forces have fought -- security forces have talked with protesters in quite a -- in quetta. many are defying calls to end their sit in protests. --y are demanding former demanding more protection for she is in government. -- for shias in government. >> have agreed to bury their dead. -- some have agreed to
in parliament behind me. >> mean while there were confrontations between protesters and demonstrators in greece. demonstrators are demanding a halt to planned spending cuts and tax hikes. one-third of the 11 million people in greece are unemployed. an associate of -- of a singapore businessman expected of being part of a global match fixing scandal has been arrested in italy. the interval investigation, conducted with the health of -- help of fifa, authorities were tipped off by italian officials. >> delegates have been here for the last few days, discussing how endemic the problem of match fixing is a cross football. they have acknowledged max fixing, a multimillion-dollar business, could be killing the game. >> what we saw in the past was just a little. also, international friendly. i heard from the euro whole press conference -- euro pulled -- euro pol press conference that as of now there is no indication that the organization has been infiltrated. >> the secretary general has denied that they are between two years and four years behind the match fixing in terms of their ability to gather e
to washington. 17-nation eurozone is in a de deepening recession. in greece, thousands took to the streets to protest austerity measures where unemployment is in a shocking, shocking 17%. international monetary fund and economic crisis expert, ken, should we be taking very seriously the sequester and what that will do in the near term to the u.s. economy? >> the sequester is not just a cut back, but a very crude cut back, sort of just chop one finger off at every hand instead of letting somebody go. i think it was designed that way because the idea was this will force us to do something. but now they haven't. >> i'm starting to hear people in washington say, look, this is going to force some efficiencies in these agencies. they've had budgets that have been getting bigger and bigger for years, stimulus thrown into all different kind of safety net fund funds. maybe this is just tough medicine. >> it might force efficiencies into some agencies, though they really weren't planning for it, so they're having to do it pretty hectically. some agencies you don't want to cut. across the board cuts
. but the first is we're not greece. we're not japan. even though we've run up-- . >> rose: our overall economy is much stronger and the am of debt we racked up is less. we have racked up a lot. mostly because we have a combined wars and tax cuts over the last decade. >> but it's not, again, it's not one of these countries-- the secretary thing is just real quick, the secretary thing is when you say entitlement reform it actually kind of confuse the issue. we have mesd up health care system, both public and private whose costs are rising out of control. if we could get that under control, then everything else becomes solvable. but that's a reform issue. it's not just about medicare, not just about governmental though it's part of it, it's about the fact that our health-care system is messed up. so it's not entitlements per se. >> rose: david brooks wrote a column about that recently, with the idea that you know, that the critical issue about america's economy has to do with health care. >> for the long-term, absolutely, absolutely. >> rose: and it's growing and -- >> yeah. >> rose: this number
stands at 11.7%, meaning almost 19 million people are out of work. greece has the highest level of unemployment in the eu. the latest employment numbers for greece are from october. at that time, nearly 27% of greeks were unemployed. spanish employment levels are not much better. austria, germany, and luxembourg have the best employment numbers, but that's not enough to change a europe-wide trend. eurozone unemployment has been on the rise for the last five years. at the beginning of 2008, the jobless rate stood at 7.2%. today, 11.7% of eurozone residents looking for a job cannot find one. youth unemployment figures are especially worrisome. nearly one in four young people under the age of 25 cannot have a job. youth unemployment in spain tops 55%. >> german lawmakers began debating friday a controversial ban on the far-right party. the previous attempts to outlaw it failed in 2003. >> this new drive to ban the party came after revelations that a neo-nazi group linked to the npd carried out a decade- long string of racially motivated murders. >> a former high-ranking member of t
. >> the oldest football club in greece has become the latest victim of the economic crisis there. reeling of a loss of gains and top players, they're trying to raise money from fans. but the response has so far been lukewarm. >> the team is everything to these die-hard fans. they call it an addiction, a fitness. but lately, it's the team itself that is sick. some of the best players have signed up with rival teams. the rest are unhappy and losing matches in the closing minutes through what seems like carelessness. >> they continue to have stars and strong players with expensive contracts. we are going to try to reduce their contracts to make the team title. we're talking about 50% were seven great players, otherwise it will go bankrupt. >> like the rest of greece, they are cutting down on expenses wherever they can. >> the team spent one-and-a-half million dollars a month renting the olympic stadium, money and can ill afford. the 3000 fans at managed to rustle up for most games these days looks paltry on television in a state -- stadium built for 70,000. so next month, they're going to le
negotiations with assad's deputy, vice president farouk al sharaa. >>> people in greece aren't happy over how their lives have changed under a government austerity program. but government officials suggest they may have turned a corner. ai uchida joins us from the business desk. ai? >> yes, catherine, pay cuts, job cuts hasn't been easy for the greek people, but now government officials say austerity measures aimed at balancing the budget are paying off. they announced the country's primary balance in 2012 turned to a surplus. finance ministry officials said last year's tax revenues excluding debt servicing costs surpassed spending by 434 million euros. that's about $590 million. the previous year's primary balance was in a deficit by about $4.7 billion. the surplus in the primary balance is a key milestone in greece's efforts to restore its fiscal health. but the greek public is largely unhappy with the government's measures. major labor unions across the country are calling for a general strike later this month. >>> u.s. justice department officials have demanded $5 billion in damages from
in elevating these events from the ordinary to the extraordinary. (cohen) i did a film in greece and in astoria queens about this terrific community of epirot musicians. every time they have one of their celebrations-- it could be a wedding or it could be a feast day-- they have to have music. [tambourine, drums, and clarinet playing] you can't have that ritual unless you have that good music. and the best musicians are up there in the mountains of greece, and they'll fly into athens for that one festival. the issue of money isn't important-- that he's there. [music continues] you know, most places, when you want to get excited, you go faster, but somehow with the epirots, they go slower when they want to show how intense they are and expressions of agony and pain and ecstasy-- slow-moving, exotic things... it's crazy. and they dance, and they kind of outdo each other. and they lead each other around doing these slow, slow, slow things. it's very elegant. well, by the time you get involved in that, everybody's sweating and pouring on the energy and slowing down. they're no longer where they wer
.3%. greece's economy shrank 6.0% compared to a year earlier. for the whole of 2012, the eurozone economy contracted by 0.5% as a whole. in 2011, the single currency area grew by 1.4%. >>> japan's gross domestic product for the final quarter of 2012 shrank slightly, that's for the october to december period. it marks the third straight quarter of contraction. cabinet office officials say it fell to a decline of 0.4% in annual terms. the base of decline was more moderate than the previous period when it was minus 3.8%. weak global demand was dragging down the economy. exports shrank 3.7%. capital spending at companies went down 2.6%. meanwhile, government spending grew 1.5% due to strong reconstruction demand in the areas hit by the 2011 disaster. housing investment also showed growth of 3.5%. consumer spending was up 0.4% due to strong sales of winter clothing. overall gdp for 2012 rose 1.9% from the previous year. that's the first growth in two years. . >>> policymaker will ease the -- bank members were in unanimous agreement. they say the economy appears to have stopped weakening. offic
seeing windy conditions due to a series of storm systems across mediterranean. italy and greece. one wind report in greece up to 80 kilometers per hour. this will shift off towards the north and eastern europe and see some snowfall accumulate up in moscow where the high is at 2 degrees. warsaw 1. in london and paris 5 and 6 but a nice mild 10 degrees to start off your weekend there in madrid. that's a look at your world weather here's the extended forecast. >>> for all of us here at "newsline" i'm james tangan. thank you for joining us
a week before international lenders decide on the next installment of greece's bailout. so live pictures there from athens on that protest there by the trades union is continuing to protest against the austerity measures imposed by the government and greece is relying on the i.m.f., e.u. and european central bank to help it meet the requirements of trying to beat its debt and emerge from the financial crisis. so live pictures there from athens. and researchers in brazil have for the first time managed to document the birth of a rare giant arm dillo. take a look at these pictures. at the right of your screen. after five months trained on a burrough, a remote camera managed to capture the baby and mother on film. organizations from around the world provided cameras for the project and the footage reveals clues about the lives of this mysterious mammal which can be used to aid conservation efforts in the future. so that is the arm dillo there. it seems to be reaching out for something, i think. staying with the animal kingdom, a young royal penguin is receiving treatment after washing up on
amount with trillions in deficits every year, we're headed towards greece. we're going to make them look solvent. >> at one pentagon official says, "it really scares the hell out of meat." does it scare you? >> we are not greece, but you can get to be them with silliness like this and no responsibility. evan is right. the president is leading, but not in the direction that he wants. he is leaving to blame the republicans, which i suspect he will succeed in. the republicans seem to have this affinity for suicide diving. they will get blamed. the only answer here is to get together and obama thinks he has them on the ropes. republicans cannot seem to get it together. >> we just heard dr. rand paul said the sequestration was the president's idea. wasn't it? >> who cares. it's a bad idea on both sides. and the the president's responsibility. this is typical washington. it is the president's responsibility more than anyone else's, particularly a second term president. it's his responsibility to rise above this. he's not doing it. >> i'm not sure you something. this was the cover of "the new y
.9%. the leading economies also shrank, germany contracted 0.6%. france by 0.3%. in terms of greece, its economy shank 6% compared to a year earlier. for the whole 2012, the whole economy contracted by .5%. in 2011 the single currency area grew by 1.4%. >>> near japan gross domestic product shank slightly for 2012 for the october to december period. it does mark the third straight quarter of contraction. cabinet office officials say gdp for the quarter fell 0.4% from the previous three months. that's a decline of 0.4% in annual terms. the pace was more moderate than the previous period when that came in at minus 3.8%. weak global demand was dragging down the economy. exports shrank 3.7%. capital spending at companies saw a 2.6% decline. meanwhile, government spending grew 1.5%. this was due to strong reconstruction demand in areas hit by the 2011 disaster. housing investment also showed growth of 3.5%. consumer spending also with a gain of .4% due to strong sales of winter clothing. overall, gdp for 2012 rose 1.9% from the previous year and that is the first growth that we have seen in two years
there is criticism -- in greece as well, there is criticism. people are really suffering in many parts of europe. on employment is up with very little growth. italy, perhaps it is the starkest images at -- of all. he you have a movement that no one had even heard of four years ago and a one more votes than any other party. -- and it won more votes than any of the party. >> now to the markets and the business world. chris morris talking there about a wild card. markets do not like raw cards, do they? >> they do not. it is important to stress why. chris manchin to italian economy. we're talking are europe's third largest economy anda wild card. the world's largest bond market. italy has the second-highest debt burden as one of the members of the euro. it is second only to greece. the markets hate uncertainty, and the italian election results could not been more of a worst- case scenario for investors around the world. and the stock markets have been falling across europe, in fact, around the world. main stock market commodity for the nimm -- the down considerably. borrowing costs are up. the impac
than they put in. the bond market is a funny thing. in greece, the bond market was perfectly fine until february of 2010. not movinging, not doing anything and then in two weeks, it was over. when we were at 10 trillion and now, we're at 16 trillion, the interest cost on 16 trillion is 20% less than it was on the 10 trillion. now, come on. do you think that's sustainable? so, if you normalize interest rating, i'm not talking about just normalize where they were before qe and took them to 5.7% federal funding cost of this debt, that's 500 billion a year. in interest expenses goes out the door. we're having a heart attack over an $85 billion sequester when we can lose 500 billion just if you normalize? but the way markets work, if and when this were to happen, you keep going because the market figures out you have a credit problem, which is what's happened in the foreign nations. >> do you think we'll see a bhoe up? >> the biggest is congress not getting the market signal. you can scream all you want about congress and the president being clowns, i can't think of any political system anyw
. they were trained to collectively bargain and organize into unions. when world war ii started, greece became much but a prominent in the civil rights section and as a result start to think about how to write the workers. it takes a whole bunch of cases in which the rights of black workers are at stake and prosecutes all kinds of employers for violations of civil rights laws. >> host: was defined by executive order? >> guest: is formed by president frank was about and at their request of the attorney general and frank murphy was a big labor guide. he was from michigan. he was a very big supporter of labor union and he goes on to a career as a supreme court justice commences at the product of individual rights as well. >> host: what kind of pricey to get when it was first formed? just go there with him that controversy. a lot of what it does over the course of world war ii i think it can need because it's small and largely flies below the radar screen. >> host: does it still exists? >> guest: i came the civil rights division of the department of justice and 1857, so it doubles in 1957 and beco
than 50%. the truth is we have numbers that are, let's say come in the same area in greece. and it is the numbers about cricket if germany would have done the cuts that the greece government has done, we would have to do cuts about 300 billion euros a year in germany. and i don't know if anyone could imagine what this would mean for the economic but also for the social development in his coach. therefore, of course we need a consolidation of the budgets in different touch. but we need also, let's say, a growth agenda for the next year. and we have to admit that some countries like greece and spain, people need more time to reduce their deficit. this is a clear consequence. otherwise, this is going to be a very, very long recession in this country's, and this of course not very, let's say, supportive for the development and the euro zone and the european union. >> thank you. we will take some questions from the audience. questions? bill. where is the -- and we will take three questions and you can ask them if in the aggregate. >> [inaudible] >> our discussion about -- has of
of greece? check out the front cover of the latest addition. "we follow president obama's plan, the u.s. will be in worse shape than greece is today." it will take 25 years, maybe sooner. the federal debt is the problem. we have to make serious spending cuts now. we could be like greece. interesting. and frightening. tracy: nobody is cutting anything any time soon. what do they drink in greece? ashley: -- tracy: okay. get that out. revealing illegal immigrants would be allowed to come and become legal permanent residents. marco rubio had this to say. >> it would be dead on arrival in congress, leaving us with unsecured orders and a broken legal immigration system for years to come. no surprise. lou dobbs is here and has something to say about this. lou: i am not riled up, by the way, at all. this is entirely to be expected. the bipartisan plan, which they almost have complete. they have not been paying attention for the past four and a half years. this is a partisan issue. the republicans clamoring as best they are darling little hearts can do to catch up. they are not doing so. i am
policies that are laying the groundwork for this country to end up, well, like that. like greece. take a look at how our world currencies are faring against the dollar. ♪ did you know not all fiber is the same? citrucel is different- it's the only fiber for regularity that won't cause excess gas. it's gentle and clinically proven to help restore and maintain regularity. look for citrucel today. how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it byerging two tools into one. combining your customized charts with leading-edge analysis tools from recognia so you can quickly spot key trends and possible entry and exit points. we like this idea so much that we've applied for a patent. i'm colin beck of fidelity investments. our integrated technical analysis serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >> at 24 minutes past the hour, i have your fox news and it. the family of the blade runner's girlfriend wants to know why this happened to her daughter and why he did it. country music singer mindy mccready wa
george papandreou, the former socialist prime minister of greece. believe it or not, the former prime minister is teaching a class at columbia. the ivy league school, columbia, how to govern during a financial crisis. added that workout for everybody? papandreou was forced out when greece was racked by violence street protests against his management of a financial crisis. the country on the verge of default. many were calling for the country to exit the eurozone. they're european union built greece out. i should say it that way. bad news for alec baldwin also known as an angry liberal. the 54-year-old actor is being investigated for a hate crime over recent altercation with a new york post reporter and photographer. baldwin, according to reports, fired off racial slur of the photographer who is african-american. then he threatened to choke the reporter. the post reported it to the new york police department, a recording of the incident where he denies all allegations. up next, instead of making any effort to fix the limning sequester, you know, picking of the phone, calling the speake
is that the debt's in dollars. we can't run out of cash. we print the stuff. >> right. >> and greece, the crucial thing is not so much that the debt is owned by non-greece as that the debt is in euros. that gives them way less flexibility. if you take a country like us, to me it's even hard to tell the story. you say, you know, supposed that we have a run on -- supposed that foreigners decide we're not reliable. how does that drive up interest rates? the fed controls short-term interest rates. long-term interest rates reflect expected short rates. how is that supposed to happen? the answer is actually it's not an easy story to tell. >> economics, news, politics. right now washington is run by politics. so they are in a budget-cutting mode. they are in a spending, cutting spending mode. how do they do that and not hurt the economy? >> well -- >> they're going do it, right? >> big spending cuts in the near term look a lot less likely now than they did a couple of months ago. so people are -- >> that makes you happy? >> that makes me happy. and, you know, the -- there's no imminent crisis that's bei
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 349 (some duplicates have been removed)